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Full text of "WBAI folio"

WBAI Folio 

from the 

Pacifica Radio Archives 



Ihis co\cr sheet created b\ Internet Arehixe for formattinE 



WBAI-FM 99.5 mc April 16-April 29, 1962 



Subscriber's Program Folio 




Lubai 



Published biweekly by Radio Station WBAI, 30 East 39th Street, New York I&, 
N. Y., telephone OXford 7-2288. Available only to WBAI subscribers. WBAI it 
owned and operated by Pacifica Foundation, a nonprofit corporation. 
Subscription Rates: per year, basic, $12.00; supporting, $18.00; sustaining, $25.00; 

nn^^piAii c^iii^ contributing, $50.00; associate, $75.00; patron, $100.00; participating, $250.00; 

PROGRAM FOLIO soonsor, iSOO.OO; Tojnder, $1 .000.00. All contributions, and all subscription amounts 
above the basic $12.00 are tax-deductible. 

VOL. THREE NO. 8 broadcast HOURS: 7 a.m. to midnight, Mon. to Sat.; a a.m., Sun. Dates of 
luture rebroadcasts appear In BOLD FACE, caps and parentheses. Example: 

(JANUARY 17). Dates of original broadcasts appear In light face and in parentheses. Example: (January 10). 

Numbers in parentheses following music selections Indicate approximate timing, In minutes. 

* Indicates new record release. 



In California: Pacifica Foundation— KPFA, 2207 Shaftuck Avenue, Berkeley 4; KPFK, 3729 Cahuenga Blvd., No. 
Hollywood. Subscriptions to any Pacifica station are transferable to any other. 



OUR SPRING PRE-DEFICIT DRIVE FOR $25,000 

to achieve the aims of WBAI 

WBAI COMES OF AGE in its programming and principles, able to achieve 
the full goals of Pacifica Radio. Starting as a quality commercial radio station, we 
have spent two years establishing the possibilities and leadership of listener- 
supported radio in New York. Today, we are ready to exploit those possibilities so 
as to show how much a voice of free radio can accomplish. 

WBAI COMES OF AGE in its community role. The city's intellectual life has 
been at the center of our programming. Today, instead, our programming is 
becoming a center of the city's intellectual life. We are attracting the devotion and 
support of the finest elements, ready to join us even at personal sacrifice. As a 
result: 

WBAI COMES OF AGE in its staff. Listener-supported radio is new and can 
only slowly acquire and train its own manpower pool. Today, after two years of 
effort, virtually all of WBAI's active operations are manned by persons trained 
outside of commercial radio. They come from Pacifica stations and from the 
cultural community. These results (see back cover) have been attained with no 
increase in payroll costs. 

WBAI COMES OF AGE as a community project. All our outside individual 
programs and series are donated. Our folio mailings and subscriptions are handled 
by an ever-changing corps of volunteers. Today, our subscriptions stand at 1 1,600 
— more than halfway to the goal of a self-sustained operation. And the number 
of FM sets in the area — which are our potential source of support — is growing 
rapidly. 

WBAI COMES OF AGE financially. This year our budget leaves a gap of 
only $25,000 — scarcely over one-tenth of total costs — to be filled by the Spring 
general fund drive, before anticipated summer losses when new subscriptions fall 
ofF. (It does not, to be sure, cover all other funds to be raised.) The amount is just 
half of the goal we had to set at this time last year. We did not quite reach it then. 
We absolutely must reach it now. It makes the difference between fulfillment, and 
running on a treadmill to stand still. 

You have been subjected to many appeals, from us and from others. But 
please do make this all-out effort now, so that we can go through with our all-out 
effort for you. 

Send us your checks, tax-deductible, to WBAI-FM, 30 East 39th Street, New 
York 16. Get a friend to subscribe. Let us help you arrange fund-raising and 
subscription parties and other benefit affairs. This is the time to do it. 

MEL MOST TREVOR THOMAS 

Manager and Director, WBAI President, Pacifica Foundation 



THE AIMS OF WBAI 

in the third year of Pacifica listener-supported radio in New York 

Subscribers' Station WBAI-FM emerges as an extraordinary adventure in radio, a mid-20th 

Century Chautauqua of ttie air. With two California sister-stations, it forms Pacifica Radio, each 
supported by its voluntary subscriptions. Unobligated to any advertisers, institutions or administrations, 
they are a free voice for the voiceless, an exception to the rule of mass media. They provide open 
platforms, unafraid pioneering and rare programming, for minorities of taste, of intellect, of ideas 
and ideals. 

Our operating principles forbid Pacifica Radio to accept any advertising or control over its 
programs, nor are they handed to you by anybody. Pacifica stations make it a principle to depend on 
their listeners — communication supported for its ov^n sake alone. Gandhi similarly held that public 
institutions should depend on "subscriptions voluntarily received from yeor to year." 

Making it voluntary is port of the principle. Anyone can listen. He pays only if he values it. It 
thus provides for the minority audience interests of the supporters who are closest to us in spirit; 
at the same time it helps them spread their thinking to a broader public that is listening in. 

Unlike advertisers, listener-supported radio does not depend on maximum audiences for each 
individual program, and does not compete for undivided loyalty of attention. It can program at will 
for different minorities. It is where you hear the other man's view. 

Our programming principles ore therefore based on a high degree of quality and personal 
dignity, on freedom of speech, on minority needs and expression, as well as significance and interest, 
beauty and delight. All our programs must meet these standards. No matter how just, we give no air 
time merely to publicize a cause or award a "free commercial." 

In the same way, we will not seek to "balance" one program against another merely for the 
sake of balance, if the material on one side appears inferior and would lower our standards. Nonethe- 
less we offer and believe in free expression for all (including those who oppose it for others and would 
be less likely to support WBAI). 

Above all, we are seeking programs that the listener cannot get from the mass media, so 
imbalance may actually be counter-balance. 

Our "causes" and role. Ours is a platform presenting many viewpoints, productions and infor- 
mation, but we do not offer editorials or positions of our own. Our "causes" ore really principles of 
selection — we believe that people should think for themselves, and we never try to tell our listeners 
what to think. But, like every communications medium, we cannot escape deciding what is worth 
thinking about. That is where our selections do give WBAI an impact and role. 

The orientation of our choices turns naturally to those wider concepts that are the bases of 
Pacifica operating principles. If WBAI programs are to be based on presenting high quality, personal 
dignity, free expression and minority rights on the air waves, it means we consider them of highest 
importance outside of radio as well. We coll attention to them, to things that produce them and things 
that threaten them, without comment of our own. 

But above oil we are interested in exploring the factors that produce change — the ferment on 
the periphery of established society, on every frontier — new directions in thinking and in culture and 
in the arts, including of course the art of radio. 

WBAI is unstereotyped — off-Madison Avenue, off-Broadway, off-campus, off-governmental, 
off any party lines. We will always be a mystery to those who must fit everything into one or another 
pigeonhole. We can be taken at will for too uppish or too raffish, too academic or too crude, too 
rightish and too leftish (both). Those are inevitable side-effects, but not our purpose. 

Our purpose is to serve as a voice of free radio, free culture and free expression, exploring the 
full development of each. 



Page 4 



WBAI Program Folio 



MONDAY, April 16 

7:00 NIRVANA SYMPHONY: By the Japanese 
composer. Toshiro Mayuzumi, performed by ihe 
Japanese Radio Orchestra conducted by Wilhelm 
Schuchier, (Apr. 4) 

7:45 COMMENTARY: Ed Engbery and another 
Know-Nothing Award. 

8:00 CIVIL LIBERTIES: P. D. East receives the 
1962 Fiorina Lasker Award. One in a series of 
rebroadcasts for early listeners. 

8:15 NEWS AND WEATHER 

8:20 HAYDN MASSES 

MISSA ST. JOANNIS DE DEO 

(Vienna Ens/Gillesberger) (Lyric 30) (20) 

MASS IN E FLAT, GREAT ORGAN MASS 
(Vienna Ens/Grossmann) (Vox 7020) (40) 

9:20 MISS LONELYHEARTS: The first of three 
readings by S. J. Stearns of the novel by Nathaniel 
West. 

10:00 FROM PACIFICA'S ARCHIVES: Preventive 
Detention — Dr. Kofia Busia. leader of the Ghana 
opposition party is interviewed by Jon Donald. 

10:45 ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (Apr. 4) 
ELGAR Chanson de Matin, Op. 15, No. 2 
LALO Symphony, G minor 
CASELLA Italia, Op. 11 
STRAVINSKY Jeu de Cartes 

12:00 WINDS OF THE PEOPLE: A fresh look at the 
outbreak of the Spanish Civil War, conceived as 
a tribute to the people of Spain by its writer and 
producer, Dolores de Viznar, with technical dir- 
ection and production by Fred Haines and nar- 
ration by Charles Levy. Included are readings from 
Lorca, Neruda, and Prados. Presented here in 
connection with the Proclamation of the Republic 
of Spain, April 14. 1931. 

1:15 JUSTICE WARREN AT N. Y. D.: The Chief 
Justice of the United States is heard in a recent 
talk. 

2:15 CHAMBER MUSIC (Apr. 10) 

MOZART Cassazione-Quartet, E\) major 
VACHON Quartet, F minor. Op. 11, No. 5 
BEETHOVEN Piano, Violin Sonata, E\, major 
DVORAK Piano Trio, F minor. Op. 65 
BEETHOVEN Piano, Wind Quintet, Ef, major 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See 

Page Fifteen. 

5:30 CHICAGO FOLK FESTIVAL: The first of ten 
programs. 

6:00 ORCHESTRAL CONCERT 

SIBELIUS Symphony No. 7 in C, Op. 52 
(London Sym/CoUins) (Lon 1008) (25) 
*BARTOK Piano Concerto No. 2 (Wehner, 

Hungarian State/Ferencsik) (West 19003) (30) 

7:00 NEWS: Chris Koch. 

7:15 COMMENTARY: Dr. Martin Dworkis, Prof, of 
Public Administration, N. V. U. (APR. 17) 

7:30 BE PLEASANT ABOUT THE NEW RELI- 
GIOSITY: An article by Donald Sutherland, 
Professor of Classics at Colorado, which appeared 



recently in Colorado Quarterly. John Baker reads. 
(APR. 24) 
8:00 MUSIC FORUM: a new series that will be 
devoted to important issues of musical life. In the 
first program Aaron Copland, Elliott Carter and 
Felix Greissle will discuss the life and times of the 
pioneer International Society for Contemporary 
Music with WBAI Music Director Eric Salzman. 
(APR. 19) 

9:30 BOOK REPORT: One in a series of talks about 
new books by John Leonard. (APR. 17) 

9:45 SIT-DOWN AT WETHERFIELD: Hallock 
Hoffman of the Center for the Study of Demo- 
cratic Insttiutions interviews Sir Robert Watson- 
Walt, inventor of radar, about his recent trip to 
London with Linus Pauling to testify for the 
■■Committee of 100". (APR. 19) 

10:20 SILENCE: occasionally we'll schedule a pause 
for the benefit of all-evening listeners. 

10:25 EXPERIMENT: Short periods of time, from 
time to time, to experiment with sounds and/or 
ideas. (APR. 19) 

10:45 SZENT-GYORGYI ON DEMOCRACY: The 

Nobel Prize laureate, at the World Congress of 
Psychiatry in Montreal. (Archives) 

11:15 NEWS, COMMENTARY: Edward P. Morgan. 

11:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES: Com- 
poser Henry Cowell discusses and presents tra- 
ditional music from more corners than four. 
(APR. 22) 

12:00 THE NEWGATE CALENDAR: or Malefactors' 
Bloody Register, containing the Lives and Trans- 
actions, various exploits and Dying Speeches of 
the Most Notorious Criminals who suffered Death 
Punishment in Gt. Britain and Ireland, with 
striking reflexions on the conduct of those unhappy 
wretches fallen sacrifice to the laws of their coun- 
try. The first program in a Midnight Series, pre- 
senting the infamous Catalogue. I: Introduction 
to the edition published by Capricorn Books, read 
by the author, Sandra Lee Kerman, revised for 
Pacifica Radio. 

12:30 THE DRUNK IN THE FURNACE: W. S. 

Merwin reads from his poetry. 

1:15 FRENCH ORCHESTRAL-VOCAL MUSIC 

(Apr. 13) 

DEBUSSY Gigues from "Images" 

ROUSSEL Suite in F 

AURIC Phedre 

(Paris Conserv/Tzipine) (Ang 35118) (19) 
MILHAUD The Lightbearers 

(Lamoureux Ens/Markevitch) (Dec 9956) (32) 

TUESDAY, April 17 

7:00 ZARA DOLUKHANOVA: The Russian Mezzo- 
Soprano is heard with a Moscow chamber or- 
chestra. (Apr. 11) 

HANDEL from "Admeto" and "Amadigo di 
Gaula" 

PERGOLESI Se tu mami 
MARCELLO Quella fiamma che m'accende 
STRADELLA Pieta, Signore 
CALDARA Come raggio del sol 
GIORDANI Caro mio ben 
CARISSIMI Vittoria, Vitloria 



7:45 COMMENTARY: Dr. Martin Dworkis. (Apr. 16) 
8:00 BOOK RKHORT: John Leonard. (Apr. 16) 
8:15 NEWS AND WEATHER 

8:20 ORCHESTRAL CONCERT 

HAYDN Symphony No. 96, D major "Miracle" 
(Vienna Phil/ Munchinger) ( Lon 1756) (22) 

MOZART Piano Concerto No. 24, C minor, K. 491 
(Bashkirov, USSR Radio/Gauk) (Artia 168) (31) 

BEETHOVEN Wellington's Victory 
(Grch/Gould) (RCA 2433) (17) 

9:35 MISS LONELYHEARTS: Part Two. 

10:15 JEWS IN THE U.S.S.R.: A discussion by Moshe 
Decter, Jewish Minorities Research, and Morris 
Schappes, historian and editor of Jewish Currents. 

(Archives) 

11:15 CHAMBER MUSIC BY SCHUBERT (Apr. 12) 
Piano Quintet, A major, D 667 "Trout" 
Piano Trio, No. 2, Ej, major. D. 929 

12:30 ON LEGALIZING PROSTITUTION: The 

merits and problems debated by psychologist Har- 
old Greenwald and Ernest Van den Haag, Lec- 
turer in Social Philosophy at the New School. 
(Archives) 

1:30 EVERYMAN: Raymond Raikes' radio version 
of the morality play (BBC). (Apr. 14) 

2:30 CONTEMPORARY ORCHESTRAL MUSIC 
(APR. 26) 

KHACHATURIAN Violin Concerto 

(Ricci. London Phil/Fistoulari) (Lon 1537) (38) 
BERLINSKI Symphonic Visions 

(Tokyo Orch/Korn) (CRI 115) (20) 
NONO Epitaph for Garcia Lorca 

(Naples Orch/Scherchen) (RAI Tape) (13) 
CARTER Minotaur Ballet Suite 

(Eastman-Rochester/Hanson) (Mer 50103) (26) 
BERG Three Pieces, Op. 6 

(Orch/Craft) (Col 5616) (19) 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See 

Page Fifteen. 

5:30 CHAMBER/VOCAL MUSIC 

BEETHOVEN Bagatelles, Op. 119 

(Matthews, pno) (Van 1033) (14) 
COPLAND 12 Poems of Emily Dickinson 

(Lipton, Copland) (Col 5106) (29) 
CLEMENT! Trio No. 1 in D 

(Trio di Bolzano) (Epic 3351) (12) 

6:30 YIDDISH FOLK SONGS: Another in a series 
of programs of songs from the past and their 
stories, conducted by Ruth Rubin. Mrs. Rubin is 
the compiler and editor of "A Treasury of Yiddish 
Folksongs", published by Schocken Books. 

7:00 NEWS: Chris Koch. 

7:15 COMMENTARY: Alan Rich, music critic, NEW 
YORK TIMES. (APR. 18) 

7:30 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher presents 
1929 recordings, excerpts from Debussy's Pelleas 
et Melisande, performed by Yvonne Brothier and 
Charles Panzera, Piero Coppola conducting. (APR. 
20) 

8:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVOLUTION: 

Gunther Schuller. (APR. 20) 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 5 



some highlights in 



public affairi 



SIT-DOWN AT WETHERFIELD 

April 16 (April 19) 

CHILDREN OF McCOMB 

April 17 (April 22) 

THE CITIZENS AT THE WHITE HOUSE 

April 18 (April 23) 

MARXISM AFTER 100 YEARS 

April 18 (April 20) 

THE DILEMMA SINCE JOHN DEWEY: 
Three folks 

April 19 (April 23) 

THE HOMOSEXUAL IN OUR SOCIETY 

April 21 (April 25) 

WHAT HAPPENED ON EASTER? 

April 22 

THE NATURE OF THE SOVIET SYSTEM 

April 23 (April 25) 

JEWISH IMMIGRATION FROM 
POLAND AND CZECHOSLOVAKIA 

April 24 (April 26) 

BUYING AN AUTOMOBILE 

April 25 (April 28) 

FROM THE CENTER 
April 26 

A DEFENSE OF THE SECRET ARMY 

April 27 

CUBA, THE U. S. AND 
THE CRISIS OF LATIN AMERICA 

April 28 



Page 6 



WBAI Program Folio 



9:00 CHILDREN OF McCOMB: 15-year-old Brenda 
Travis, a McComb. Miss., high school student 
who requested service at ; Greyhound Bus lunch 
counter as an inter-state traveler, is now in re- 
form school; and 113 of her schoolmates must 
now go to school elsewhere for demonstrating on 
her behalf. In this program, Thomas Hayden and 
Robert Zellner tell of their experiences when they 
become involved in the young people's protest. 
(APR. 22) 

10:15 VOCAL RECITAL: including songs by Grieg 
*and Griffes sung by Norman Myrvik, tenor, with 
Emanuel Levenson, piano. (EMS 501) (APR. 29) 

10:45 THEODORE BIKEL AT HOME: The actor- 
folksinger entertains. 

11:15 NEWS, COMMENTARY: Edward P. Morgan. 

11:30 THE MODERN JAZZ SCENE: Phil Elwood. 

12:00 THE NEWGATE CALENDAR — II: Hear! 
Captain John Kidd, executed for Piracy! Hear! 
Mary Young (alias Jenny Diver), Executed for 
Street Robbery! Hear! William Johnson and Jane 
Housden, Executed for the Murder of Mr. Spur- 
ling! The readers: Lew Merkelson and Bob Pass. 

12:45 THE HARMFULNESS OF TOBACCO: Anton 
Chekhov's short tale read by H. Cooper. 

1:00 POETRY AND ITS RELATION TO REAL- 
ITY: Poet-anthologist Oscar Williams, describing 
the commercial Scylla and academic Charybdis 
between which the American poet must steer. (Ar- 
chives) 

1:45 RONALD ON RONALD: A young, widely- 
exhibited painter delivers what he describes as a 
"Rube Goldberg art lecture". 

WEDNESDAY, April 18 

7:00 ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (Apr. 15) 
BARTOK-WEINER Two Roumanian Dances 
DVORAK Symphony, B^ major. Op. 4 

8:00 COMMENTARY: Alan Rich. (Apr. 17) 

8:15 NEWS AND WEATHER 

8:20 CONTEMPORARY CHAMBER MUSIC 

BRANT Signs and Alarums 

(Ens/Brant) (Col 4956) (10) 
BERGSMA Third Quartet 

(Julliard Qt) (Col 5476) (21) 
COPLAND Sextet 

(Julliard Qt.; Oppenheim, cl.; Hambro, pno.) 

(Col 4492) 
BRANT Galaxy 2 

(Ens/Brant) (Col 4956) (5) 

9:20 MISS LONELYHEARTS: last installment of 
the West novel. 

10:00 THE CITIZEN AT THE WHITE HOUSE: Mrs. 
Francis Witlin, a housewife and mother, is inter- 
viewed by Hamish Sinclair on her two-week at- 
tempt to get an interview with President Kennedy 
to register her views on bombs in the atmosphere; 
about her subsequent arrest and release. (APR. 23) 

10:35 ORCHESTRAL MUSIC BY BRAHMS (Apr. 9) 
Serenade No. 2, A major. Op. 16 
Symphony No. 2, D major, Op. 73 



11:50 THE ROLE OF THE WRITER IN AMERICA 

— I: The first of three programs in this Folio re- 
corded at the Esquire Writers Symposia of 1958 
and 1959, featuring Saul Bellow, Leslie Fiedler, 
Dorothy Parker and Wright Morris. (APR. 29) 

1:15 TOMORROW'S ILLITERATES: Specialists' re- 
ports indicate that 70% of American young people 
are reading badly. Dr. Charles C. Walcult dis- 
cusses current methods of instruction in our 
schools. (Archives) 

1:45 OPERATIC DOUBLE-BILL: Two works by 
Mozart — "Lo Sposo Deluso", an Opera Buffa in 
two acts, and "La Clemenza di Tito", a historic- 
ally-based opera in two acts. Italian Radio pro- 
duction. (Apr. 15) 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See Page 
Fifteen. 

5:30 JAZZ CONCERT: Milt Jackson and Oscar 
Peterson. 

6:00 ORCHESTRAL CONCERT 

*R1EGGER Dance Rhythms 

(Cleveland/Lane) (Epic 3819) (6) 
BARTOK Violin Concerto No. 1 

(Stern, Phila/Ormandy) (Col 5677) (22) 
SCHUBERT Symphony No. 6, C major 

(Lon Sym/Schmidt-Isserstedt) (Mer 50196) (29) 

7:00 NEWS: Chris Koch. 

7:15 COMMENTARY: to be announced. 

7:30 REPORT TO THE SUBSCRIBER: Station 
Manager Mel Most with news and information 
about WBAI and Pacifica. (APR. 22) 

7:45 THE LESBIAN: Richard C. Robertiello, author 
of Voyage from Lesbos (Citadel), frankly discusses 
the origins and treatment of Lesbianism. 
(Archives) (APR. 25) 

8:00 THE WORLD OF MUSICAL COMEDY: Stan- 
ley Green discusses the Negro in the musical 
theatre and presents excerpts from (among others) 
"Showboat", "Blackbirds of 1928", "Porgy and 
Bess", "Bloomer Girl", "House of Flowers", 
"Kwamina", and "No Strings." (APR. 23) 

9:00 MARXISM AFTER 100 YEARS: The first of 
two lectures by historian Bertram D. Wolfe, author 
of Three Who Made A Revolution. (APR. 20) 

10:20 ANTHOLOGY OF FRENCH SACRED MU- 
SIC: Seventh in a series of programs recorded by 
leading French musicians. Tonight, organ music by 
Boely, Widor, Vierne and Tournemire, played by 
Maurice Durufle. (BFA) 

11:15 NEWS, COMMENTARY: Edward P. Morgan. 

11:30 JAZZ CONCERT: Thad Jones and Charles 
Mingus. 

12:00 THE NEWGATE CALENDAR — III: The 

dreadful doings and undoings of Matthew Clarke, 
Executed for Murder; and John Sheppard, Exe- 
cuted for Highway Robbery. 

12:45 THE RHYTHM METHOD AND BIRTH CON- 
TROL: A discussion between Dr. Alan F. Gutt- 
macher and Dr. John Rock. (Archives) 

1:30 THE BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET: Play- 
ing two of Mozart's quartets. (Columbia) (Apr. 9) 
Quartet No. 14, G major, K. 387 
Quartet No. 15, D minor, K. 421 



THURSDAY, April 19 

7:00 VLADIMIR ASHKKNA/.Y: The young Russian 
pianist plays works by Chopin. (Apr. 13) 
Barcarolle. Op. 60 

Walu No. 2. Af5 major, Op. 34. No. 1 
Mazurka No. .37. A minor. Op. 59, No. 1 
Sonata No. 3, B minor. Op. 58 

7:45 SIT-DOWN AT WETHERFIELD: Hallock 
Hoffman and Sir Kobert Walson-Watt. (Apr. 16) 

8:15 NEWS AND WEATHER 

8:20 PIANO CONCERTI 

IRELAND Concerto in E\) 

(Bianca, Hamburg Phil, Walther) (MBM 3366) 
STRAV INSKY Concerto for Piano and Winds 

(Seemann. Berlin Phil Scherman) (Dec 9963) 
MOZART Concerto No. 22 in E\). K. 482 

(Demus. Berlin Radio Doktor) (DDG 18588) 

V:35 V.\NITY F.-VIR: Episode One of Twelve, in the 
BBC dramatization of Thackeray's novel. 

10:05 EXPERIMENT (Apr. 16) 

10:30 ML'SIC FORL'M: Eric Salzman with Aaron 
Copland. Elliott Carter and Felix Greissle. (Apr. 
16) 

12:00 FROM PACIFICA'S ARCHIVES: Is Naziism 
Alive in .\inerica7 A documentary report produced 
by T. T. Drinkwater and narrated by Bob Hamb- 
ley, with contributions from John Roy Carlson. 
Dr. Martin Deutsch, Lincoln Rockwell and Oscar 
Cohen. 

1:15 FROM PACIFICAS ARCHIVES: Nazi Leaders 
— A Personal View. The former Baron Munch- 
hausen. in the German Foreign Office until 1938, 
serving for a time as Goering's interpreter, gives 
his personal reminiscences of Hitler, Goering. 
Goebbels, Himmler, Hess. Ley. Streicher. Ribben- 
trop and Seys-Inquart, in an interview by Colin 
Edwards of CBC. 

1:45 TWO TALES: Burton Raffel is heard in a read- 
ing of his stories, "Death By Logic" and "The 
White Desert." 

2:15 SYMPHONIES (Apr. 5) 

TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 2. C minor. 

Op. 17 
HINDEMITH Symphonia Serena 
BERLIOZ Funeral and Triumphal Symphony. 

Op. 15 
BEETHOVEN Symphony No. 7. A major. Op. 92 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See Page 
Fifteen. 

5:30 THE FILM ART: Gideon Bachmann in Mos- 
cow. (Apr. 15) 

6:00 CHAMBER CONCERT (APR. 26) 

BRAHMS Sonata No. 1 in C. Op. 1 

(Eugene List) (Van 1016) (24) 
SCHOENBERG Pierrot Lunaire 

(Howland, Ens/Winograd) (MGM 3202) (34) 

7:00 NEWS: Chris Koch. 

7:15 COMMENTARY: Marshall Windmiller, Politi- 
cal Science Dept., San Francisco State. (APR. 20) 

7:30 THE DILEMMA SINCE JOHN DEWEY: A 

Historian. The first of three talks this evening from 
the Fourth Annual Dalton Schools PTA Confer- 
ence, this one by Dr. Lawrence A. Cremin, Pro- 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 7 



some highlights in 



music 



MUSIC FORUM: Eric Salzman, Aaron 
Copland, Elliott Carter, Felix Greissle 

April 16 (April 19) 



JAPANESE MUSIC 

April 19 (April 21) 
April 26 (April 28) 



THE SEVEN LAST WORDS OF CHRIST 

April 20 (April 23) 



REPORT ON MUSIC: Eric Salzman 

April 20 (April 24) 
April 27 



BACH'S ST. JOHN PASSION 

April 22 (April 25) 



MUSIC FORUM: Eric Salzman, Milton 
Babbitt, Gunther Schuller, Thomas Hilbish 

April 23 (April 26) 



CONTEMPORARY MUSIC FESTIVAL, 
OSAKA, JAPAN 

April 26 (April 28) 



SCHUMANN'S GENOVEVA 

April 29 



STUDIO CONCERT 

The Beaux Arts String Quartet 

April 29 



Page 8 



WBAI Program Folio 



fessor of Kducation and Chairman. Depl. of Social 
and Philosophical Foundalions of Education. 
Teachers College. (APR. 23) 

8:00 A BOOGIE WOOGIE BALLAD: The Toucliin' 
Case of Mr. and Mrs. Massa, a poetic drama by 
St. Clair McKelway. here rendered by Fred 
Haines, with State Street's Jimmy Yancey on ac- 
companying piano. (.APR. 23) 

8:15 THE DILEMMA SINCE JOHN DEWEY: A 

Psychoanalyst Dr. Lawrence S. Kubie. Director 
of Training at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospi- 
tal. Towson. Maryland. (APR. 23) 

8:50 INTERMISSION: Thor Heyerdahl. a brief in- 
interview; Kon-Tiki. via the BBC. 

9:00 THE DILEMMA SINCE JOHN DEWEY: An 

Educator. TTie noted educator and former Presi- 
dent of Sarah Lawrence College, Harold Taylor. 
(APR. 23) 

9:30 LILIOM: The Ferenc Molnar drama produced 
for Pacifica Radio by the Advance Theatre Foun- 
dation, Los Angeles. Directed by John Dikeos. 
with technical direction by John Stachowaick. 
James Tartan is Liliom. 

10:45 JAPANESE MUSIC: Robert Garfias. student of 
and writer on Oriental music, formerly a student 
and consultant with the Imperial Gagaku Musi- 
cians. Japan, in the first of an illustrated series 
on traditional Japanese music. Tonight: Gagaku. 
(APR. 21) 

11:15 NEWS, COMMENTARY: Edward P. Morgan. 

11:30 JAZZ CONCERT: Pee Wee Russell, Buck Clay- 
ton and Tommy Flanagan. 

12:00 THE NEWGATE CALENDAR — IV: Part 
One of two readings from the case of Jonathan 
Wild (he of Gay. Fielding and Brecht). Peachum's 
reader: David Atkinson. 

12:45 CHORAL CONCERT (Apr. 11) 

MAHLER Das Klagende Lied 
ORFF CatuUi Carmina 

2:00 INTERLUDE AT SPANISH HARBOUR: A 

play by Margery Sharp, adapted for the BBC by 
George Archbold. 

FRIDAY, April 20 

7:00 18TH-CENTURY ORCHESTRAL MUSIC: 

played by the Berlin Chamber Orchestra. (Apr. 10) 
L. MOZART Concerto for Trumpet. D major 
C.P.E. BACH Symphony No. 3. F major 
DITTERSDORF Concerto for Double-Bass, E[, 

major 
C.P.E. BACH Symphony No. 1. D major 

7:45 COMMENTARY: Marshall Windmiller. (Apr. 19) 

8:00 EMOTIONAL FACTORS IN NEARSIGHTED- 
NESS: Charles R. Kelley discusses psychological 
aspects of myopia. (Archives) 

8:15 NEWS AND WEATHER 

8:20 CONTEMPORARY CHAMBER MUSIC (Apr. 

12) 

JANACEK Quartet No. 2 

SEEGER Quartet 

HINDEMITH Quartet No. 3 

FOSS Quintet from "Studies in Improvisation" 
9.35 VANITY FAIR: Part Two. 



10:05 MARXISM AFTER 100 YEARS: Bertram D. 
Wolfe. (Apr. 18) 

11:15 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVOLUTION: 

Gunther Schuller. (Apr. 17) 

12:15 MILLER READS MILLER: Dramatist Arthur 
Miller is heard in readings from a group of his 
plays (SA 704) 

1:00 THE ROLE OF THE WRITER IN AMERICA 

— II: Saul Bellow, Leslie Fielder, Dorothy Parker 
and Wright Morris, at the 1958 Esquire Writers 
Symposia. (APR. 29) 

2:15 ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (APR. 23) 

VIVALDI Concerto in g "Per S.A.R. di Sassonia" 
(NY Sinfonietta/Gobermann) (LRM) (13) 

BACH Concerto in d for Two Violins 

(Scheiderhan. Baumgartner. Lucerne Fest) (Arc 
3099) (17) 

FISCHER Le Journel de Printemps 

(Voisin. tpt; Ens/Vardi) (Kapp 9062) (13) 
RAMEAU Concert an Sextuor No. 2 

(Toulouse Orch/Auriacombbe) (MG 4) (II) 
CORELLI Concerto Grosso in F. Op. 6. No. 6 

(Copenhagen Orch/Hansen) (BG 586) (12) 
ALTENBURG Concerto for Seven Trumpets and 

Timpani (Ens/Vardi) (Kapp 9050) (4) 

3:30 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher with re- 
cordings by Yvonne Brothier and Charles Panzera. 
(Apr. 17) 

4:00 SHANGHAI GESTURE: These days it sounds 
absurd, but what's wrong with being absurd? 
Florence Reed stars in John Colton's 1926 melo- 
drama. (Decca) 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See Page 
Fifteen. 

5:30 JAZZ CONCERT: Benny Carter, Coleman 
Hawkins. Phil Woods and Charles Rouse. 

6:00 SEVEN LAST WORDS OF CHRIST: Haydn's 
♦oratorio performed by soloists, the Vienna Acad- 
emy Chorus and Opera Orchestra conducted by 
Hermann Scherchen. (West 19006) (APR. 23) 

7:00 NEWS: Chris Koch. 

7:15 COMMENTARY: Roger Bryant Hunting, attor- 
ney and author. Who Sues In New York City? 
(Col. Univ. Press.) (APR. 23) 



7:30 PHILOSOPHY EAST AND WEST: 
Watts. (APR. 22) 



Alan 



8:00 UNEMPLOYMENT, AUTOMATION AND 
THE SHORTER WORK WEEK: Harry Van 
Arsdale, Jr.. Business Manager for Local 3. IBEW, 
President of the N. Y. C. Central Labor Council. 
AFL-CIO, is heard at the 8th Annual Faculty- 
Alumni Seminar, School of Industrial Labor Rela- 
tions, Cornell University. 

8:40 HEMISPHERE POLITICAL MOVEMENTS: 

a talk by Ambassador Donatello Herrera, Alter- 
nate Representative of the Dominican Republic 
to the U.N. 

9:00 REPORT ON MUSIC: Chronicle and calendar 
of musical life. Music director Eric Salzman will 
begin a review of recent developments in contem- 



poraiy music with works of Elliott Carter and 
Milton H.ibbitt by way of recorded illustration. 
(APR. 24) 

10:30 IHK PKNAL COLONY: A dramatic reading of 
the Kafka story, produced by Dale Minor for 
Pacitica. 

11:15 NEWS. COMMKNTARY: Edward P. Morgan. 

11:30 JAZZ ARCHIVES: Phil Elwood. 

12:00 FOLK Ml SIC: From midnight until about 2:M). 
folk nuisician Bill Faier plays his favorite folk 
records (mainly old-time Amercian); some talk, 
but mostly music. 

SATURDAY, April 21 

7:00 CHAMBER .ML SIC (Apr. 2) 
BARTOK Uuartet No. 1. A minor 
DUKE Quartet. C major 
HONEGGER Sonatine for Two Solo Violins 
WEIGL Sonata for Viola, Piano 
BLOCH Suite for Viola Alone 
TOCH Quartet. Op. 70 

9:15 PROGRA.MS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See Page 
Fifteen. 

10:30 J.APANESE MUSIC: with Robert Garfias. Part 
One, Gagaku. (Apr. 19) 

11:00 THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF KENNETH 
REXROTH: The poet, critic, and playwright, in 
the first of an extended series of recorded notes 
against his autobiography, to be published ulti- 
mately by New Directions. 

11:30 THE HOMOSEXUAL IN OUR SOCIETY: One 

of Pacifica Radio's most discussed programs — a 
panel on the challenging social problems of homo- 
sexuals and homosexuality. Participating are 
Harold Call. Dr. Blanche M. Baker. Mrs. Leah 
Gailey. Dr. Karl M. Bowman, Dr. Frank A. 
Beach, Jr., Morris Lowenthal and David H. Wil- 
son. Produced and moderated by Elsa Knight 
Thompson. (APR. 25) 

1:30 TILLIE OLSEN: First of two rebroadcast-by- 
request readings by the author of Tell Me A Riddle 
(see 9:00 p.m.). In this program, Mrs. Olsen reads 
her moving story, I Stand Here Ironing. 

2:00 JAZZ: Les Davis. 

4:30 THE LAST MINUTE: The immediate. 

5:15 U.N. REPORT: Malcolm Davis. 

5:30 .MORE .4BOUT .MEDICINE: Alden Whitman 
and Dr. Howard Reid Craig discuss the New York 
Academy of Medicine. (APR. 26) 

5:45 FROM PACIFICA'S ARCHIVES: New York 
— A Master Plan? An architect, planner and a 
builder debate whether or not New York City 
should devise a "master plan." Participants: 
Victor Gruen. Irwin Wolfson and New York Plan- 
ning Commissioner James Felt. 

7:00 TRIOS 

CORELLI Trio Sonata No. 12 in d. Op. 5, "La 

FoUia" 

(Grehling. Wenzinger, Neumeyer) (Arc 3008) 
WEBERN Five Canons. Op. 16 

(Martin, sop. Lurie. cl., Ulyate, b. cl.) (Col 232) 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 9 



some highlights in 



tffe artf 



MISS LONELYHEARTS 

April 16, 17, 18 



VANITY FAIR 

Morning Serial, beginning April 19 



MOLNAR'S "LILIOM" 

April 19 



ROLE OF THE WRITER IN AMERICA 

April 18,20,24 (April 29) 



THE PENAL COLONY 

April 20 



THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF 
KENNETH REXROTH 

April 21, 28 



LANGSTON HUGHES 

April 21 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAMS FOR 
OLDER PEOPLE 

April 22 



CHINESE POETRY 

April 23 (April 26) 



KING LEAR 
April 28 



THE NEWGATE CALENDAR 

Midnight Seriol, beginning April 16 



Page 10 



WBAI Program Folio 



DEBUSSY Sonata for Flute, Viola, Harp 

(Wanausek. Weiss, Jellinek) (West 5207) (18) 
HAYDN Divertimento No. 109 in C 

(Salzburg Barytontrio) (Arc 3120) (13) 
KIRCHNER Trio for Violin, "06110 and Piano 

(Rubin, Neikrug, Kirchner) (Epic 3306) (15) 
CHOPIN Trio in g 

(Oistrakh, Knushevitzky, Oborin) (West 18174) 
BEETHOVEN Trio in E flat. Op. 1, No. 1 

(Alma Trio) (Dec 10041) (26) 

9:00 TILLIE OLSEN: Mrs. Olsen reads her long 
story. Hey, Sailor, What Ship? 

10:00 FROM PACIFICA'S ARCHIVES: The Liberal 

Inquisitors. Well-known for their techniques of 
interviewing others, David Susskind, Barry Gray 
and Mike Wallace in this program engage in a 
free-swinging discussion as they are interviewed 
by Gene Bruck and Dick Elman. 

11:00 LANGSTON HUGHES: A reading by the poet 
of a number of his poems before an audience at 
the University of California. (Archives) 

SUNDAY, April 22 

8:00 VOICE WITH ORCHESTRA (Apr. 10) 

BACH Cantata No. 32, Liebster Jesu 

FORTNER Die Schoepfung 

FALLA El Amor Brujo 

LANE Four Songs 

FRANCO The Virgin Queen's Dream Monologue 

BERLIOZ Four Songs 

RAVEL Sheherzade 

10:15 REPORT TO THE SUBSCRIBER: news and 
information about WBAI. (Apr. 18) 

10:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES: Henry 
Cowell. (Apr. 16) 

11:00 PHILOSOPHY EAST AND WEST: Alan 
Watts. (Apr. 20) 

11:30 WHAT HAPPENED ON EASTER?: The first 
Easter is discussed by prominent clergymen includ- 
ing Episcopalian, Southern Baptist, Unitarian 
Universalist, followed by a round-table discussion. 
Produced by Southwest Council of Liberal Min- 
isters, moderated by Dr. Edward Borgers, of 
U.S.C. 

12:30 EASTWARD HOI: A rebroadcast of the Ja- 
cobean comedy by Marston, Chapman and Jonson 
(BBC). 

2:00 BACH'S "ST. JOHN PASSION": in a new 

♦Westminster recording with Hermann Scherchen 
conducting the Vienna Academy Chorus and State 
Opera Orchestra, including as soloists, Phyllis 
Curtin, soprano; Eunice Alberts, alto; Waldemar 
Kmentt, tenor; Frederic Guthrie, bass; with John 
vanKesteren as the Evangelist, Otto Wiener as 
Jesus, David Smith as Pilate, and Robert Springer 
as Peter. (APR. 25) 

4:30 THE FILM ART: Gideon Bachmann interviews 
English actor Peter Finch in Moscow. (APR. 26) 

5:00 MR. EDISON'S AMBEROLA: By means of 
cylinders and an original Edison phonograph. 
Byron Bryant and Glenn Glasow explore instru- 
mental and vocal music recorded between 1906 
and 1915. 



5:30 CHAMBER MUSIC (Apr. 6) 
WOLF Italian Serenade 

MIASKOVSKY Quartet No. 4, F minor. Op. 83 
CARTER Sonata, Flute, Oboe, Cello, Harpsichord 
POULENC Sextet for Piano, Winds 

6:45 CHILDREN OF McCOMB (Apr. 17) 

8:00 YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAMS FOR 
OLDER PEOPLE: A program prepared by Elinore 
Bruce, scheduled in response to mail suggesting a 
lot of our younger people are older people, 
anyhow. 

8:30 CHILDREN OF THE A-BOMB: At the request 
of their teachers, 2,000 children of Hiroshima 
wrote compositions about their experiences. 105 of 
them were printed in Japan and translated into 
English by Jean Clark Dan and Ruth Sieben- 
Morgan (Uchida Rokakuho, Tokyo). A small 
group of the compositions are read by Bill Butler. 

9:15 REYNOLDS OF HIROSHIMA: The man who 

sailed his yacht into the Bikini testing area, with 
his own report on the effects of radiation in Hiro- 
shima which he has been compiling independently 
of the AEC. 

9:45 EXPERIMENT 

10:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ: Martin Williams, with 
Whitney Balliett on trumpeter Jabbo Smith. 

11:00 POETRY READ BY DAVID ALLEN 

11:30 PARIS SPOTLIGHT 

MONDAY, April 23 

7:00 HAYDN'S "THE SEVEN LAST WORDS" 

(Apr. 20) 

8:00 COMMENTARY: Roger Bryant Hunting, 
(Apr. 20) 

8:15 NEWS AND WEATHER 

8:20 A BOOGIE WOOGIE BALLAD (Apr. 19) 

8:35 AUNT MOLLY JACKSON: She tells her stories, 
with occasional bursts of melody, but the songs 
are sung mainly by John Greenway, (Folkways 

5457) 

9:30 VANITY FAIR: Episode III. 

10:00 ORCHESTRAL CONCERT (Apr. 20) 

11:15 THE WORLD OF MUSICAL COMEDY: Stan 
ley Green. (Apr. 18) 

12:15 U. S. GOALS OUTSIDE THE U. S.: A talk by 
Dr. Neal D. Houghton, Professor of Government, 
Univ. of Ariz., recorded for Pacifica. 

1:00 THE DILEMMA SINCE DEWEY: Lawrence 
A. Cremin. (Apr. 19) 

1:30 CHINESE POETRY: A conversation between 
Tseng Tai-yiu, poet and artist, and Glen Glasow, 
with Mr. Tseng chanting poetry to the music of 
Ho Ming Chung; English readings by Judy Brun- 
din. (APR. 26) 

2:00 THE DILEMMA SINCE DEWEY: Dr. Law- 
rence S. Kubie, (Apr. 19) 



2:35 EXPERIMENT (Apr. 22) 

2:45 THE DILEMMA SINCE DEWEY: Dr. Harold 
Taylor. {Apr. l**) 

3:15 CHAMBER MUSIC 

HANDEL Flute Sonata, C major. Op. 1 No. 7 

(Conrad, Koch. Ruf) (Arc .M5) (1 1) 
ROUSSEL Trio for Flute. Viola, Cello 

(Dwyer, de Pasquale, Mayes) (Boston 208) (15) 
KODALY Duo for Violin and Cello 

(Eidus. Starker) (Period 510) (25) 
BEETHOVEN Quartet, F minor. Op. 95 

(Amadeus Quartet) (DGG 18536) (20) 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOLNG PEOPLE: See Page 
Fifteen. 

5:30 CHICAGO FOLK FESTIVAL: the second of 
ten programs. 

6:00 ANDRE CAMPRA'S REQUIEM: the French 

*baroque composer's Messe des Morts performed 

by soloists, the Philippe Caillard and Stephane 

Caillat Chorales and the Jean-Francois Paillard 

Orchestra under Louis Fremaux. (West 19007) 

7:00 NEWS: Chris Koch. 

7:15 COMMENTARY: Mrs. M. Fergenbaum, Vice 
Pres. of Organized Tenants, Inc. (APR. 24) 

7:30 THE CITIZEN AT THE WHITE HOUSE: Mrs. 
Frances Witlin interviewed by Hamish Sinclair 
(Apr. 18) 

8:05 MUSIC FORUM: a recent concert featured a 
new work by Salvatore Martirano that required 
100 hours of rehearsal and another by Milton 
Babbitt that needed far less since it is partly elec- 
tronic. Eric Salzman discusses the implications of 
all this with Mr. Babbitt. Gunther Schuller and 
Thomas Hilbish. the conductor who directed all 
those rehearsals. (APR. 26) 

9:35 THE NATURE OF THE SOVIET SYSTEM: 

The second Bertram D. Wolfe lecture. (APR. 25) 

10:30 GROUP THERAPY: Five people, strangers be- 
fore their first session, are heard in an actual ses- 
sion, recorded at a New York City hospital 
guidance clinic. (Archives) 

11:15 NEWS, COMMENTARY: Edward P. Morgan. 

11:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLDS PEOPLES: Henry 
Cowell. (APR. 29) 

12:00 THE NEWGATE CALENDAR — V: Jonathan 
Wild, truly and terribly concluded, in the reading 
by David Atkinson. 

12:45 THE QUESTION OF PAROLE: From the 
Archives, a rebroadcast of the examination of the 
parole system by Russell Oswald, Milton Record 
and Richard Hannum, with Jon Donald. 

1:30 CONCERTOS 

VIVALDI Concerto in D minor for viola d'amore 

(Trampler. NY Sinf/Goberman) (LRM 1-3) (10) 
HINDEMITH Der Schwanendreher 

(Primrose, Orch/Pritchard) (Col 4905) (25) 
MOZART Violin Concerto No. 1 in B flat. K. 207 

(Grumiaux, Vienna Sym/Paumgartner) (Epic 

3230) (18) 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 1 1 



TUESDAY, April 24 

7:00 MUSIC FROM SWITZERLAND (Apr. 11) 

SCHIBLER Symphony No. 3 
BECK Viola Concerto 

7:45 COMMENTARY: Mrs. M. Fergenbaum. 

(Apr. 23) 

8:00 NEWS AND WEATHER 

8:05 BE PLEASANT ABOUT THE NEW RELIGI- 
OSITY: an article by Donald Sutherland. (Apr. 16) 

8:35 HEINRICH SCHLUSNUS: The late German 
baritone is heard in a program of "lieder", origi- 
nally during the 1930's. (Apr. 5) 

9:50 VANITY FAIR: Part IV. 

10:20 THE ROLE OF THE WRITER IN AMERICA 
— Ill: The final program from the Esquire Writers 
Symposia, with Ralph Ellison, Norman Mailer, 
Mark Harris, and Dwight MacDonald. (APR. 29) 

11:30 REPORT ON MUSIC: Review of recent contem- 
porary developments with Eric Salzman. (Apr. 20) 

1:00 LEGALIZED GAMBLING IN NEW YORK: 

A discussion by Harold Mayer, Legal Aide to the 
Mayor, and Milton Wessel, Atty. General's Spe- 
cial Group on Organized Crime. (Archives) 

1:45 CONTEMPORARY ORCHESTRAL MUSIC 

(Apr. 7) 

NIELSEN Symphony No. 6 
BLOCH Violin Concerto 
BERG Chamber Concerto 
ANTHEIL Symphony No. 4 

4:00 SEEGER IN SAN FRANCISCO: the folksinger 
with KPFA's Trevor Thomas, Gert Chiarito and 
Elsa Knight Thompson. (APR. 29) 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See Page 

Fifteen. 

5:30 CHAMBER MUSIC 

SCHUBERT Rondo in D, Op. 138 

(Badura-Skoda, Demus, duo-pno) (West 19344) 

(7) 
*OVERTON Sonata for 'Cello and Piano 

(McCracken, Greene) (EMS 403) (22) 
MENDELSSOHN String Quintet No. 1 in A, 

Op. 18 

(Pascal Qt., Gerhard) (CHS 1172) (29) 

6:30 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher with the 
first of two programs on baritone Riccardo Strac- 
ciari (1875-1955). Tonight, recordings of 1910- 
1925. (APR. 27) 

7:00 NEWS: Chris Koch. 

7:15 COMMENTARY: Herbert Aptheker, Ed., Politi- 
cal Affairs, a monthly theoretical organ of the 
U. S. Communist Party. (APR. 25) 

7:30 JEWISH IMMIGRATION FROM POLAND 
AND CZECHOSLOVAKIA: Charlotte Jacobson, 
of Hadassah, recently relumed from Eastern 
Europe where she made a study of the Jewish 
immigration problems, interviewed by Elsa Knight 
Thompson of KPFA. (APR. 26) 

8:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVOLUTION: 

Gunther Schuller. (APR. 27) 



Page 1 2 



WBAI Program Folio 



9:00 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT AND CARL 
SANDBURG: The architect and poet discuss the 
"Chicago" school of architecture with moderator 
Alistair Cooke. (Library of Congress) (APR. 27) 

10:00 TOMORROWS GREAT ANONYMOUS 
ARCHITECTURE: An article from the WFMT 
Perspective, subtitled "Farewell to Geinus: Wright, 
Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe". from Leonardo 
Ricci's Anonymous (20fh Century) translated by 
E. M. Borgese (Braziller). It examines the Gug- 
genheim, Seagram Building, etc., and is read by 
John Ohiiger. (APR. 27) 

10:45 THEODORE BIKEL AT HOME 

11:15 NEWS, COMMENTARY: Edward P. Morgan. 

11:30 THE MODERN JAZZ SCENE: Phil Elwood. 

12:00 THE NEWGATE CALENDAR — VI: The mat 

ter of Nathaniel Hawkes, Tortured, and After- 
wards Executed for Robbery, and another, of 
Margaret Dixon, Murder. 

12:45 "SOLOMON": G. F. Handel's 1748 oratorio per- 
formed by The Beecham Choral Society and the 
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. (Apr. 13) 

WEDNESDAY, April 25 

7:00 MUSIC FROM COLONIAL AMERICA (Apr. 5) 
GEHOT String Quartet, D major. Op. 7, No. 6 
REINAGLE Sonata for Early Piano 
MOLLER String Quartet, E\y major 

7:45 COMMENTARY: Herbert Aptheker. (Apr. 24) 

8:00 THE LESBIAN: a discussion. (Apr. 18) 

8:15 NEWS AND WEATHER 

8:20 MUSIC FOR CHAMBER ORCHESTRA (Apr. 
3) 

PURCELL The Virtuous Wife Suite 
ARENSKY Variations on a Tchaikovsky Theme 
HINDEMITH Five Pieces for String Orchestra 
BAUER Suite for Strings 
MOZART Symphony No. 14, A major, K. 114 

9:30 VANITY FAIR: Part V. 

10:00 THE NATURE OF THE SOVIET SYSTEM: 

Bertram Wolfe. (Apr. 23) 

11:00 BACH'S ST. JOHN PASSION: with soloists 
and a Vienna ensemble conducted by Hermann 
Scherchen. (Apr. 22) 

1:30 CHILDBIRTH WITHOUT PAIN: The Lamaze 
Method. A discussion with Dr. Benjamin Segal, 
Dr. William K. Rashbaum, Elizabeth D. Bing, 
Marjorie Karmel and two parents. (Archives) 

2:45 PIANO AND ORGAN (Apr. 3) 

MOZART Sonata No. 14, C minor, K. 457 
FRANCK Fantasia, A major 
MOUSSORGSKY Pictures at an Exhibition 
PARRY Fantasia, Fugue, G major 
BEETHOVEN Sonata, F minor. Op. 57 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See Page 
Fifteen. 

5:30 JAZZ CONCERT: Bill Evans. 

6:00 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY ORCHESTRAL 
MUSIC 

BOISMORTIER Sonate pour les violons. Op. 34 
(Gerard Cartigny Orch) (Mus Old 18) (8) 



MOZART Symphony No. 22 in C, K. 162 

(London Orch/Leinsdorf) (West 18756) (9) 
DAUVERGNE Concert de Simphonie, Op. 3, 

No. 1 

(Gerard Cartigny Orch) (Mus Gld 18) (12) 
HAYDN Concerto for 'Cello and Orch, Op. 101 

(Mainardi. Munich Ens) (Arc 3110) (28) 

7:00 NEWS: Chris Koch. 

7:15 COMMENTARY: to be announced. 

7:30 REPORT TO THE SUBSCRIBER: News and 
information about WBAI, Pacifica, etc. (AJR. 29) 

7:45 BOOK REPORT: John Leonard. 

8:00 NEW AMERICAN ORCHESTRAL MUSIC 

*TANENBAUM Variations for Orchestra 
(Japan Phil/Watanabe) (CRT 149) (23) 

*WUORINEN Symphony No. 3 

(Japan Phil/Watanabe) (CRI 149) (18) 

*IMBRIE Legend for Orchestra 

(San Fran Orch/Jorda) (CRI 152) (14) 

9:00 CONSUMER PROBLEMS — II: Buying an 
Automobile. Examining some of the complexities 
that confront the car shopper are several auto- 
mobile dealers, a mechanic and a representative 
of a finance institution. A documentary produced 
by Alex Quarmyne for Pacifica Radio, under a 
grant from the Consumers Union. (APR. 28) 

10:00 ANTHOLOGY OF FRENCH SACRED MU- 
SIC: eighth in a series of programs recorded by 
leading French ensembles. Tonight, music by 
Faure, Satie and Schmidt. (BFA) 

11:15 NEWS, COMMENTARY: Edward P. Morgan. 

11:30 JAZZ CONCERT: Howard McGhee and Teddy 
Edwards. 

12:00 THE NEWGATE CALENDAR — VII: More 
Malefaction at Midnight. Francis Charteris, Con- 
victed of Using Violence to the Person of Ann 
Bond; and Captain John Porteous, Convicted of 
Murder, and Murdered by the Mob. 

12:45 THE HOMOSEXUAL IN OUR SOCIETY 

(Apr. 21) 

THURSDAY, April 26 

7:00 CHILDREN TAKE COVER: A leap into the 
morning with a documentary on the psychological 
effects of air-raid drills and procedures on chil- 
dren, rebroadcast for those who can listen early 
but seldom at other times. (Archives) 

8:15 NEWS AND WEATHER 

8:20 COMMENTARY: to be announced. 

8:35 CHAMBER CONCERT (Apr. 19) 

9:35 VANITY FAIR: Episode VI. 

10:05 EYEWITNESS — CHINA: Swiss Radio-TV cor- 
respondent Dr. Heiner Gautschy, one of a few 
Western journalists to visit China in recent years, 
talks with Dick Elman. (Archives) 

10:45 MORE ABOUT MEDICINE: Alden Whitman 
and Dr. Howard Reid Craig. (Apr. 21) 

11:00 CONTEMPORARY ORCHESTRAL MUSIC 

(Apr. 17) 



1:00 JEWISH IMMIGRATION FROM POLAND 
AND CZECHOSLOVAKIA (Apr 24) 

1:JI0 ML'SIC EORl'M: Kric Sal/m;m with Millon 
Babbit. Ciiinther ScliuUer and Thomas Hilbish. 
(Apr. 23) 

3:00 TREASON: A play by Saunders Lewis, in a 
performance produced by the BBC. Richard Burton 
and Emlyn Williams in the leading roles. 

4:.10 PROGRAMS FOR VOL NG PEOPLE: See Page 
Fifteen. 

5:30 THE FILM ART: Gideon Bachmann. (Apr. 22) 

6:00 VOCAL RECITAL 

GLINKA Barcarolle: To Her; Do Not Excite Me 

Without Cause (Vishnevskaya/Dedyukhin) 

(RCA 2497) (8) 
WOLF Michelangelo Lieder 

(Borg Werba) (DGG 1202.3) (II) 
EGK Tentation de Saint-Antoine 

(Benningsen/Koeckert Qt) (DGG 18401) (25) 
SCHUBERT Dem Unendlichen; Lied der Mignon; 

An die Musik (Nilsson/Taubman) (RCA 2578) 

(12) 

7:00 NEWS: Chris Koch. 

7:15 COM.MENTARY: Hallock Hoffman, Director, 
Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions. 
(APR. 27) 

7:30 CHINESE POETRY (Apr. 23) 

8:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC FESTIVAL — 
— OSAKA, 1961: Recorded at Mido Hall, Osaka, 
with performances by the Festival Orchestra and 
smaller ensembles, conducted by Seiji Ozawa 
(NHK). 
ICHIYANAGI Music for Strings No. 2; Music 

for Piano, Nos. 4, 6 (9) 
IRINO Music for Vibraphone and Piano (7) 
TAKEMITSU Ring for Flute, Guitar and Lute (9) 
MAYUZUMI String Quartet (14) 

9:00 FROM THE CENTER: Dean Zelman Cowen, 
world authority in constitutional law. Dean of 
Law School, Melbourne, Australia, co-chairman 
of the Conference on Emerging Nations held re- 
cently at the Center for the Study of Democratic 
Institutions, is heard in a summary of the confer- 
ence. Participating are Robert M. Hutchins and 
members of the staff. 

10:00 THE MILITARY IN BIG BUSINESS: A debate 
between Norman Thomas and Ret. Gen. John C. 
Medaris, introduced by Columbia Professor Tom 
Warner. Recorded by WKCR. 

10:45 JAPANESE MUSIC: Robert Garfias in the sec- 
ond program on Gagaku. (APR. 28) 

11:15 NEWS, COM.MENTARY: Edward P. Morgan. 

11:30 JAZZ CONCERT: Joe Newman and Frank Wess. 

12:00 THE NEWGATE CALENDAR — VIII: John 
Collins (Murder). Jonathan Bradford (Supposed 
Murder), Lydia AdIer (Manslaughter). Eugene 
Aram (Murder). 

12:45 THE OUTLAWS: The title of a book by 
Danilo Dolci. who tells Jon Donald of his attempt 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 1 3 



to bring work and dignity to the bandit-peasants 
of western Sicily, the work of the Mafia, and 
more. (Archives) 

1:45 REWARD: To anyone who guesses what will be 
in this space — one sample Folio. 

FRIDAY, April 27 

7:00 ODE ON THE DEATH OF HENRY PUR- 
CELL: John Blow's tribute to Purcell, composed 
to a text by John Dryden. Also presented are sev- 
eral vocal and instrumental pieces by Purcell, with 
all performances by the New York Pro Musica, 
Noah Greenberg. director. (Decca) (Apr. 3) 

7:45 THOM GUNN: A much-discussed young British 
poet, in a reading from My Sad Captains and 
earlier poems. 

8:15 NEWS AND WEATHER 

8:20 COMMENTARY: Hallock Hoffman. (Apr. 26) 

8:35 EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY ORCHESTRAL 
MUSIC (Apr. 25) 

9:35 VANITY FAIR: Part VH. 

10:15 FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT AND CARL 
SANDBURG: with Alistair Cooke. (Apr. 24) 

11:15 TOMORROW'S GREAT ANONYMOUS 
ARCHITECTURE (Apr 24) 

12:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVOLUTION: 

Gunther SchuUer. (Apr. 24) 

1:00 THREE SISTERS: Chekhov's play adapted for 
the BBC by Peter Watts. 

2:45 CLARINET TRIOS 

MOZART Trio, Efc, major, K. 498 

(A & W Boskovsky, Panhoffer) (Lon 1609) (21) 
BARTOK Contrasts 

(Mann, Drucker, Hambro) (BRS 916) (16) 

3:30 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher with re- 
cordings by Riccardo Stracciari. (Apr. 24) 

4:00 MY WORD: A BBC Panel Game, the first of 
fourteen in a Friday daytime series, with E. Arnot 
Robertson, Frank Muir, Denis Norden and others. 
The chairman is Jack Longland. 

4:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See Page 
Fifteen. 

5:30 JAZZ CONCERT: Wes Montgomery. 

6:00 ORCHESTRAL CONCERT 

PERGOLESI Concerto in G for Flute 
(Gazzelloni, 1 Musici) (Epic 3760) (16) 

STRAVINSKY Pulcinella-Suite 

(Orch Suisse Rom/Ansermet) (Lon 1494) (22) 

RAVEL Concerto for the Left Hand 

(Francois, Paris Con/Cluytens) (Ang 35874) (18) 

7:00 NEWS: Chris Koch. 

7:15 COMMENTARY: Mrs. Rosemary McGrath, Na- 
tional Board of Directors, Young Americans for 
Freedom. (APR. 30) 

7:30 NEW PROGRAMS FOR TEACHING SCI- 
ENCE: Dr. Alexander Taffel, Principal of the 
Bronx High School of Science, interviewed by Elsa 
Knight Thompson. 

8:15 A DEFENSE OF THE SECRET ARMY: Ben- 
jamin Protter, Editor of TODAY IN FRANCE, a 
monthly anti-Gaullist newsletter, is interviewed by 
Dick Elman. 



Page 14 



WBAI Program Folio 



9:00 REPORT ON MUSIC: Eric Salzman continues 
his review of the past season in contemporary 
music. Examples will include improvisations and 
compositions by Lukas Foss and his Improvisation 
Ensemble. (MAY 1) 

10:30 HISPANIC-AMERICAN REPORT: One in a 

series produced by Ronald Hilton. Director. His- 
panic-American Institute at Stanford University. 

11:15 NEWS, COMMENTARY: Edward P. Morgan. 

11:30 JAZZ ARCHIVES: Phil Elwood. 

12:00 FOLK MUSIC: With Bill Faier, until 2:30, folk 
music (a lot of old American) and at least some 
Faier winds. Beginning next Folio, this program 
will be heard at the same time on Saturday. 

SATURDAY, April 28 

7:00 CHAMBER MUSIC (Apr. 5) 

RONCALLl Lute Suite No. 1, G major 
STRAVINSKY Suite Italienne 
BEETHOVEN Trio, D major. Op. 9, No. 2 
IMBRIE Second Quartet 
BRAHMS Quartet, A minor. Op. 51, No. 2 
HINDEMITH Violin, Piano Sonata No. 3 
MOZART Quartet, E[, major, K. 171 

9:15 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: See Page 
Fifteen. 

10:30 JAPANESE MUSIC: Robert Garfias. (Apr. 26; 

11:00 THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF KENNETH REX- 
ROTH — II: Random verbalizing towards New 
Directions. 

11:30 CONSUMER PROBLEMS — II: Buying an 
Automobile. (Apr. 25) 

12:30 CUBA, THE UNITED STATES, AND THE 
CRISIS OF LATIN AMERICA: A documentary 
on the impact of the Cuban Revolution on Latin 
America and the U. S., prepared from the voices of 
many of the participants. Included are Fidel 
Castro, Raul Roa, Jose Figueres, James Wads- 
worth, and Adlai Stevenson. (Archives) 

2:00 JAZZ: Les Davis. 

4:30 ESCAPE: Books of science fiction and mystery 
reviewed by Anthony Boucher. 

5:00 THE LAST MINUTE: reserved for late program 
arrivals of importance. 

5:30 OSAKA FESTIVAL: Contemporary music re- 
corded in Japan in 1961. 

6:30 A SERMON: Dr. Martin Luther King is heard 
in a rebroadcast of Dimensions of a Complete 

Life, recorded for Pacifica. 

7:00 KING LEAR: With Stephen Murray as the King, 
a First Folio version, with a minimum of emen- 
dation by the BBC. 

9:45 CHORAL CONCERT 

BACH Cantata No. .^1, "Der Himmel lacht" 
(Vienna Ens/Prohaska) (BG 512) (31 ) 

MOZART Missa Brevis, D major, K. 194 

(Salzburg Ens/Paumgartner) (Epic ^M^) (22) 

11:00 TIGHT LIKE THAT: Music from the race rec- 
ords of the 192()"s. '.lO's and '4()'s. Blues, jazz, 
boogie and gospel from Chicago, Memphis and 
the South, With Joseph Boyd. 



SUNDAY, April 29 

8:00 CORAL CONCERT 

FRANCK Psyche 

(Netherlands Ens/Otlerloo) (Epic 3146) (44) 
DVORAK Requiem, Op. 89 

(Stader, Wagner, Haefliger, Borg, Prague Ens/ 

AncerlXDDG 18547) (90) 
10:15 REPORT TO THE SUBSCRIBER (Apr. 25) 

10:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES: Henry 

Cowell. (Apr. 23) 

11:00 THE ROLE OF THE WRITER IN AMERICA 

— I: First of the three programs, being broadcast 
today. Saul Bellow, Leslie Fiedler, Dorothy Parker, 
Wright Morris. (Apr. 18) 

12:15 ANDOR FOLDES: a recital by the Hungarian 
•^'pianist. (Deutsche Grammophon 19099) 
BEETHOVEN Piano Sonata in F, Op. 10, No. 2 
BRAHMS 4 Waltzes from Op. 39 
DE FALLA El Amor Brujo 
POULENC Nocturne No. 4 in C minor 
DEBUSSY La fille aux cheveux de lin 
CHOPIN Mazurka No. 26 in E minor. Op. 41, No. 

1; Nocturne No. 13 in C minor. Op. 48, No. 1 
LISZT Mephisto Waltz 

1:00 THE ROLE OF THE WRITER IN AMERICA 

— II: Bellow. Fiedler, Parker and Morris. (Apr. 20) 

2:00 SCHUMANN'S GENOVEVA: The German 
composer's only opera, on a text by Johann Lud- 
wig Tieck and Friedrich Hebbel. The work is sung 
in Italian by soloists and the orchestra and chorus 
of the Turin radio under the direction of Vittorio 
Gui. (RAI tape) (MAY 2» 

4:30 THE ROLE OF THE WRITER IN AMERICA 

— Ill: Ralph Ellison, Norman Mailer, Mark Har- 
ris and Dwight MacDonald. (Apr. 24) 

5:30 THE MIGRANT WORKER ON THE EAST- 
ERN SEABOARD: A panel with J. Monserrat, 
Migration Division, Commonwealth of Puerto 
Rico; William La Tourette, Garden State Service 
Cooperative; Fay Bennett, National Sharecroppers 
League; John Seabrook, N. J. Migrant Labor 
Board; and Raymond Male, N. J. Commissioner, 
Labor and Agriculture. (Archives) 

6:45 VOCAL RECITAL: Songs by Grieg and GrifTes. 

(Apr. 17) 

7:15 SOMETIMES YOU WORK A DAY: A docu- 
mentary-montage with California farm workers 
speaking of lean harvests, mechanization, housing 
and other aspects of their existence. (Archives) 

8:15 STUDIO CONCERT: Beaux-Arts String Quar- 
tet. Program of chamber music from the WBAI 
studios featuring the well-known New York en- 
semble. 

BASSETT Five Pieces for String Quartet (1957) 
MENDELSSOHN Quartet in E minor. Op. 44, 

No. 2 
AMRAM Quartet (1961) 

9:30 THE FILM ART: Gideon Bachmann interviews 
Cierman film director Bernhard Wicki, in Mos- 
cow. (MAY 3) 

10:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ: Mait Edey discusses 
some bop trumpeters of the 1940's. 

11:00 SEEGER IN SAN FRANCISCO (Apr. 24) 

11:30 PARIS SPOTLIGHT 



WBAI Program Folio 



Page 15 



PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE -4:30-5:30 p.m. 











Wi 












MONDAY, APRIL 16 

The White Deer" — Mike Tigar reads Part One 

of James Thurber's story (Harcourt). 
How the Tongans Came To Fiji, read by Jean 

Rubin. 
Two Japanese Fairy Tales (Golden), read by Bill 

Butler. 
Folk Songs from the Philippines. 

TUESDAY, APRIL 17 

•The White Deer" — Part Two. 

Fredi Dundee — the lady from Scotland is back 

again with poems and stories. 
A Scottish story read by Danny Kaye. 
The MacPherson Singers and Dancers of Scotland. 
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18 
Tales From The East — Chrystabel Weerasinghe. 



■ 1 he While Deer" — Part Three. 
Tlic Three Bears — an imusiial (?) BBC presen- 
tation. 
Songs of Yogi Bear. 

THURSDAY, APRIL 19 

"The Wliiie Deer" — Part Four. 

Sinbad the Sailor — a dramatized version. 

"Peacock Pie" — more poems by Walter de la 

Mare (Knopf) read by Peter Gerald. 
Let's Sing With The Irish. 

FRIDAY, APRIL 20 

"The While Deer" — Part Five (conclusion). 
Ali Baba — with music and narration. 
The Easter Rabbit — a story read by Evelyn Singer. 
More Songs to Grow On — Alan Mills. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 21 9:15-10:30 a.m. 

Robert Schumann — His Story and Music. 

"The Tale of Peter Rabbit", "The Tale of the 
Flopsy Bunnies", and "The Tale of Benjamin 
Bunny" — all Beatrix Potter classics told by 
Vivien Leigh. 

Afternoon in Amsterdam. 

MONDAY, APRIL 23 

Mary Alan Hokanson tells about Horatio Alger and 

reads from his stories — Part One. 
Singposts to the Little Prairie Wolf, written by 

Janet Nickelsburg, read by Arlene Sagan. 
John Ciardi reads from "I Met A Man" (Houghton- 

Milllin). 
Old Timey Songs for Children. 

TUESDAY, APRIL 24 

Horatio Alger — Part Two. 

"Ride With The Sun" — folk tales from many 

lands collected by the U.N. Women's Guild. 
Around The Block, Around The World. 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 25 

Tales from the East — Chrystabel Weerasinghe. 

"My Friend In Africa" — a book by Dr. Frederick 
Franck, read by Morris McDonald, Part One. 

"The House That Jack Built", adapted in English 
and French and illustrated by Antonio Frasconi 
(Harcourt), read by Ethel Mendelssohn, 

Children's Game Songs of French Canada, 

THURSDAY, APRIL 26 

"My Friend In Africa" — Part Two. 

Judy Brundin reads "Six Servants" by the Brothers 

Grimm. 
Sing Along in Greek. 

FRIDAY, APRIL 27 

Folk Tales from Indonesia — Harold Courlander 
Let's Find Out — British teenagers question trav- 
eller and naturalist David Attenborough. (BBC) 
Two more Japanese Fairy Stories. 
The Toshiba Singing Angels. 

SATURDAY, APRIL 28 9:15-10:30 a.m. 

Edvard Grieg — His Story and Music, 

Three young ladies — all age 13 and in the 8th 
grade at Professional Children's School, discuss 
television, books, parents and other things in a 
discussion at WBAI. They are: Leslie Sixfin, 
Katharine Dunfee and Brooke Adams. 



WBAI COMES OF AGE with this folio, which is only a start. The Broadcasting end 
Public Affairs departments have been strengthened, with News now handled sepa- 
rately from the latter, adding a morning summary (8:15 weekdays). Two new distinct 
programming departments have been established; 

Department of Music under composer Eric Salzmon, distinguished New York Times 
music critic who has joined us. Mr. Salzman, who studied under Roger Sessions, was 
a Fulbright Award composer in Rome and is author of orchestral, chamber and vocal 
works. He has many exciting plans for WBAI. 

Department of Arts and Literature under novelist William Butler, our overall Pro- 
gram Director and a leading exponent of experimental radio. Mr. Butler, whose writ- 
ings have been published here and abroad, has been in almost every phase of 
broadcasting and spoken programming at Pacifico listener-supported stations, and 
with WBAI for the past six months. 

OUR COVER, the Great Buddha of Kamakura, is a reminder that this is a holiday 
period for many different peoples of the world. So we note the month of Buddha's 
birthday (Nirvana Symphony Apr. 16, Japanese Music Apr. 19 and Osal<a Festival 
Apr. 26), the week of Passover (Jews in the U.S.S.R. and Yiddish Songs Apr. 17), and 
Good Friday and Easter (Seven Last Words of Christ Apr. 20; What Happened on 
Easter? and the St. John Passion Apr. 22). 



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